Zero star dangerous vehicles still manufactured in Latin America and Africa

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The Ford Ka was rated with zero stars, despite being the second best-selling model in Brazil’.
The Ford Ka was rated with zero stars, despite being the second best-selling model in Brazil’.
The Hyundai HB20 achieved ratings of just 10% for child occupants.
The Hyundai HB20 achieved ratings of just 10% for child occupants.

The latest testing results for Latin NCAP and Global NCAP’s ‘Safer cars for Africa’ programme show manufacturers are still producing zero-star vehicles, putting occupants and other road users at risk of serious injury and death.

Latin NCAP’s latest results saw two popular models, the Hyundai HB20 and the Ford Ka, awarded zero stars for safety. The Hyundai HB20, a popular Latin American model, produced in Brazil, achieved ratings of just 19% for adult occupants and 10% for child occupants with side impacts demonstrating poor chest protection for occupants. The Ford Ka was also rated with zero stars, despite being the second best-selling model in Brazil, achieving ratings of just 9% for child protection and 7% for the most important driver-assist technologies that support safe driving to avoid and mitigate accidents. Neither model met United Nations regulations on Pedestrian Protection and Electronic Stability Control (ESC).

In response to Latin NCAP’s testing, manufacturer Ford has committed to improve the safety of its vehicles for the Latin market, planning to update the safety equipment of the Ka offering ESC and side airbags as standard in all versions. Latin NCAP has already tested the better equipped version of the KA which showed improvements to the safety performance. The updated rating will be published as soon as Ford makes standard these key safety equipment for all Latin America region.

The fourth round of Global NCAP’s #SaferCarsForAfrica crash test results also identified serious and life-threatening safety failures in a range of popular new vehicles. The three models tested - the Steed 5 pick up from Great Wall, the Haval H1 five-door SUV and the Renault Kwid five-door compact - all gave serious cause for concern with poor levels of adult and child protection. Alarmingly the zero-rated Great Wall Steed 5 demonstrated a ‘high probability’ of life-threatening injury.

Alejandro Furas, Secretary General of Latin NCAP and Global NCAP Secretary General said: “We as consumers should reject vehicles from car makers that offer world class standard safety in some markets while in Latin America they offer such poor protection levels as standard.” Commenting on the ‘Safer ars for Africa’ programme, he added: “The contrast between the marketing claims for such vehicles and the reality of their poor safety performance could not be more stark.”