New vehicle technology legislation will make Australian roads safer, thanks to ANCAP campaign

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New vehicles are increasingly being fitted with AEB but the Australian government is making it compulsory’ and then could you embed the video link with the caption ‘ANCAP is raising public awareness of AEB and its benefits.
New vehicles are increasingly being fitted with AEB but the Australian government is making it compulsory’ and then could you embed the video link with the caption ‘ANCAP is raising public awareness of AEB and its benefits.

New road safety measures are making Australian roads safer, as a result of advocacy by the Australian New Car Assessment Progrmame (ANCAP), a partner of the FIA Foundation.

The Australian Government has announced a Regulation Impact Statement (RIS) to reduce light-vehicle crashes and trauma through the fitment of autonomous emergency braking (AEB), which will now be compulsory for all new vehicle models from July 2022 and all models by July 2024. The RIS proposes the introduction of compulsory car-to-car and pedestrian-detecting technology following ANCAP Safety campaigning for the technology uptake since 2015.

Vehicles with AEB are 55% less likely to be involved in police-reported crashes, 40% less likely to be involved in rear-end crashes, and vehicle-occupant trauma is reduced by 28%, says ANCAP.

“The proposal by the Australian Government to mandate AEB is a welcome announcement. Our latest analysis of new light-vehicle sales shows voluntary fitment of AEB has increased to 66%, with 186 new light vehicle models equipped with this life-saving technology as standard,” said ANCAP Communications and Advocacy Director, Rhianne Robson. “A key role for ANCAP is to build consumer awareness, confidence and demand for vehicle safety features and technologies, and these fitment figures demonstrate the automotive industry’s commitment to satisfying that demand.”

Across the Australia, 71% of all new vehicles are now fitted with AEB as standard. The average age of an Australian passenger car, however, is ten years, meaning just 7% of the 18 million car fleet is currently protected by the technology.

The announcement is supported by a new ANCAP television campaign - ‘Let’s re-write the ending’ - being used to build public awareness and support for the technology. The campaign uses real-life dashcam footage of two common crash scenarios – near-misses with pedestrians, and run-off-road crashes.

Watch the ANCAP television campaign.